Trudging through tragedy……

I had a pastor that used to say “Every one is either just coming out of a crisis, in a crisis, or about to enter into a crisis.”  I used to think to myself that was bold and blanketing statement. First, to think that we all must have some kind of crisis or tragedy in our life is a very grim take on life. What gives someone the authority to say I will must go through crisis? Can I not roll the dice and skip the crisis by way of choice and planning?  Secondly, you superimpose your reaction to perceived crisis on to me. In other words, I must call an event in my life a crisis because of how the world perceives it, ie. a broken arm, a broken car, a lost cat, a lost loved one. I know you rarely find someone willing to say “Boy it was a good thing I broke my arm when luckily the car broke down when I was looking for my dead grandma’s cat. I sure am glad grandma’s cat waited till after she died to run away.”  But even still, is it fair for another to tell me how I must react to something they can’t deal with? Not to mention, my wife and I made a keen observation: It seemed that the more “crisis” (drama) a family had, the higher up the food chain they climbed, in our church. It was like a popularity contest of devastations! And we were happy to be in the “out” crowd!! Even when “tragedy # 1” happened in our life, we maintained that we did not want the pseudo-sympathy, the attention, or the “drama”. That was December 2003……….enjoy the ride.

p.s. I still love that pastor to this day, but he forgot to mention; sometimes those crisis run back-to-back, non-stop.

To B(log) or not to B(log)…….

That is the question! Do you ever find yourself obsessively checking your blog hit counter? Clicking through your blog roll, and their blog roll, to find a new post? Waiting days on end at the edge of your computer chair, for SOMEONE in your blog roll write something new? Hoping SOMEONE would leave a comment (because that was a really good post)? Wondering if your visitors even read your post, because how could they not leave a comment (because that was a really good post)? Because I mean think about it. Are we writing to “express” some inner journalist in us, or are we really trying to communicate our lives to those we know? Do any of us really care to read about the daily life of someones cat, or their opinion on politics?

Well I hope that at least some of you answered yes to some of the questions posed. I check my hit counter daily, click through my blog roll daily, love it when someone comments, and hope to communicate a small part of my life with those I know. I did answer no to one: I dont like blogs that ramble about cute kitties or pseudo-intellectual rhetoric.

So I wonder why no comments. I came up with a few reasons.

Blog not, least you be blogged yourself.

Blog unto others, as you would want blogged to you.

Blog your neighbor as you blog yourself.

These are the guide lines of good blogging. (Yes I know I borrowed them from somewhere) If you want to read fresh posts on your blogroll, you too must commit to fresh posting. If you want more hits, click on others. If you want more comments, leave comments for others. And if you are going for the rhetoric bent to your blog, at least write something that inspires, heals, brings joy, and uplifts others. Refrain from big words (I have a thesaurus too) unless it is to make a profound point and you can do it with taste and excitement. And never forget, this is only cyberspace, you must bring the reality in with you.
By the way, why is blogging so fun and addictive? (Excuse me, I need to go check my hit counter……)